decrease wishlist wait period

Description: 
The wishlist wait period is currently set to 720000 milliseconds, or 12 minutes in between searches. This equals 5 searches an hour. For those of us with extensive lists, it would take 20 uninterrupted hours to process 100 searches. I understand the need not to overwhelm the system with multiple automated searches all the time but perhaps this wait period could be decreased to 72000ms, or 72 seconds, or another more reasonable time?
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If you donate, the wish list wait time is reduced to 120000 milliseconds (2 minutes / 30 searches an hour). That's a pretty nice perk. I would agree that a search every 12 minutes isn't very much if you have many search terms. I believe that the time was increased sometime last summer. It used to cycle through my wish list much quicker. I would like to see it changed to maybe 2 minutes for regular users and 18-20 seconds for those with privileges.

Does a search that has no search results use the same processing power as a search with results? Most of the time you will come up empty anyway.

Even though there aren't a great many privileged users on the server at a time, having them run a search every 18 seconds does end up taxing the server, flooding the distributed network, and affecting virtually all logged in clients, which is why we raised the limit to every two minutes. There's almost no difference between a search that returns no results and one that returns a lot of results. Both need to be distributed to everyone on the network, and both have to be processed by each and every client on the system.

Thanks, that answers the question and I agree is a very nice privelege. I'll be donating as soon as I clear up my Paypal problems.

Another releated question: once a search is performed, does it stay in memory so that any new users/files coming online that match will return a result?

The server has no knowledge of any of the files shared by any user, so memorizing searches wouldn't make sense in that context. All searches are a one-shot deal, either a user has something to return when they receive the search, or they don't.